Leo Elders (1926-2019)

Father Leo Elders died this past week at the age of 93. He was the author of hundreds of scholarly works, above all on Thomas Aquinas. He was Dutch by birth, but taught all over the world during the course of his long academic career. A brief biography can be found here.

Upcoming Conferences and More

Here are various news items that I’ve gathered. This will probably be my last post until the end of the summer.

Latest News Items

Here’s what’s come across my screen recently:

  • The Center for New Narratives in Philosophy at Columbia University is hiring a postdoc for a one-year or possibly two-year position, starting this summer. The qualifications are as follows: “The minimum qualifications are a PhD in philosophy, with research interests in the history of medieval or early modern women. Some training in gender studies, feminism, or critical race theory is desirable.” Interested parties should apply ASAP. Details here.
  • The University of Bonn is sponsoring residential fellowships to support critical editions and English translations of key texts in Islamic studies from the period 1200-1600. Applications are particularly welcomed from scholars interested in working on Ṣadr al-Sharīʿa’s Taʿdīl al-ʿulūm. Further details available here.
  • The Rare Books School is offering a long list of week-long summer courses at various American libraries, many focused on medieval manuscripts. Details here.
  • Margaret Cameron is leaving the University of Victoria (Canada) to take up the position of Professor of Philosophy and Head of School, Historical and Philosophical Studies, at the University of Melbourne.

Various News Items

Prizes and Other Announcements

It seems I’ve been negligent in posting material — judging from just how much information I have to post.

  • Congratulations, first and foremost, to Jon McGinnis and Billy Dunaway, of the Univ. Missouri-Saint Louis, who have won $1.1M from the Templeton Foundation for a project on The Christian West and Islamic East: Theology, Science, and Knowledge. The goal of the project is “linking Medieval Islamic philosophy to contemporary questions about the epistemology of religion in the analytic tradition.” Scholars working in the vicinity, or who might like to be working in the vicinity, should keep an eye on funding opportunities coming out of this project.
  • Congratulations as well to Han Thomas Adriaenssen (Groningen), whose 2017 book, Representation and Scepticism from Aquinas to Descartes (Cambridge UP), has won the annual book prize from the Journal of the History of Philosophy.
  • The Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is advertising a one-year Mellon postdoc for junior faculty in North America. Application deadline February 1, 2019.
  • The 9th Annual Veritas et Amor Contest is being advertised again, for dissertations or books by younger authors (under 35) on Thomas Aquinas. With a prize of €2000, this is well worth competing for! Deadline of February 15, 2019.
  • The Institute for Anselm Studies is accepting applications for the John and Judy Paul Summer Research Grant, for PhD students and recent graduates working on Anselm. The grant provides a week of funding at Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. Details can be found here.

Now, some conferences:

News of All Sorts

Here’s a bunch of news items I’ve been collecting for some time now, which means that some of these entries are rather old news:

  • As of this fall, Catarina Dutilh Novaes has left Groningen to take up a position at the Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam.
  • This past summer, Francis Feingold won the SMRP Founder’s Award (best paper by a younger scholar) for “Aquinas’s Discussion of Aristotle’s Claim That Knowing Does Not Alter the Knower.” Honorable mention went to Fedor Benevich, Joseph Stenberg, and Nicolas Faucher.
  • Also over the summer, the Vatican announced the opening of the digital Vatican Library, with 15,000 some manuscripts currently available (out of a total collection, in case you were wondering, of 80,000 codices).
  • Scott Williams has compiled an online bibliography for Henry of Ghent. It runs to 156 pages. (Actually, although the bibliography is what Scott asked me to advertise, it’s just one among many very useful things pertaining to Henry of Ghent that are assembled on this web page.)
  • Scott also said: just like Tobias Hoffmann’s online bibliography for John Duns Scotus. So check that out too. It runs to 396 pages.
  • While I’m on the subject of bibliographies, Thérèse Bonin continues to keep her Aquinas in English bibliography up to date, though it now has a new URL.
  • Someone else who’s been doing amazing work online is Jeffrey Witt (Loyola Univ. Maryland). A good place to start is with his Scholastic Commentaries and Texts Archive. But that’s really just the start. He’s working toward a comprehensive initiative that would enable cooperative open access publishing ventures aimed at scholastic texts.
  • For a very different sort of online presence, check out — if you haven’t already — Martin Lenz’s blog. He’s been steadily posting, for the last five months, on all sorts of topics, but especially on the history of philosophy.
  • I mentioned this a few years ago, but since it continues to grow, let me mention again that Dag Hasse and colleagues continue to build an online Arabic and Latin Glossary, aimed to offer a comprehensive guide to the vocabulary used in medieval Latin translations of Arabic texts (philosophical, medical, scientific).
  • Finally, in honor of Thanksgiving in this part of the world, our friends at the Franciscan Institute are offering 40% off all of their publications this weekend: Nov. 23 – Nov. 26. Use the code THANKS18. It’s a great opportunity to acquire some essential volumes in any medieval philosophical library.