Copenhagen, Leuven, Budapest, etc.

The University of Copenhagen has announced two 2-year postdoc positions, both focused on twelfth-century logic. Applications are due October 15, 2021. Details here.

KU Leuven–more specifically, Christophe Geudens and Nicola Polloni–have organized a two-day seminar on Knowability and the Limits of Knowledge. It will be partly medieval in focus, and partly a general discussion of epistemology. It’s on Zoom, this Thursday and Friday (September 2-3, 2021), starting at 4pm in Leuven.

The energetic folk at Leuven have also organized a series of medieval colloquia, running through the fall and spring, and especially highlighting junior scholars. The format is hybrid, in person and on zoom.

Still more, there’s a large conference, which I don’t seem to have previously announced, on Aristotle’s De sensu in the Latin Tradition 1150-1650. It’s also a hybrid event, live and on Zoom, running from Pavia to Leuven. (September 13-14, 2021, in Pavia; September 17-18 in Leuven)

There are two major conferences on the Eucharist getting underway, in September, in Budapest. First there’s a philosophical conference, on the Metaphysics and Theology of the Eucharist, which starts tomorrow! (September 1-4, 2021). It’s another hybrid event, with the schedule available here. Then there’s the 52nd International Eucharistic Congress (September 5-12, 2021), which is aimed at a much wider audience.

The American Cusanus Society is holding their biennial conference in a month, on the theme of Mystical Theology and Renaissance Platonism in the Time of Cusanus (September 24-26, Gettysburg and Zoom). Information is on Twitter!

There’s a special issue in the works, for History of Philosophy and Logical Analysis, on Revisionary Metaphysics in the Middle Ages. The guest editors are Stephan Schmid (Hamburg) and Sonja Schierbaum (Wuerzburg), and they’ve put out a call for proposals. (The deadline is April 23, 2022.)

Joseph Koterski (1953-2021)

Father Koterski, a Jesuit priest and long-serving professor at Fordham University, died of a heart attack this past week. There’s a very nice obituary here. Among his many works, I might particularly praise his Introduction to Medieval Philosophy (Blackwell, 2009), which I regard as among the best single-volume introductions to the field.

August 2021 News

The draft schedule is now available for the first of what will hopefully be a regular series of SMRP conferences (Notre Dame, October 3-6, 2021). It’s going to be a huge event; the largest medieval philosophy conference in North America since I’ve been in the field. Information available here.

The American Catholic Philosophical Association is inviting submissions from junior scholars for its annual essay contest. Details here.

The Franciscan Institute is sponsoring a conference on Roger Bacon’s Moralis Philosophia, in celebration of a new English translation of this text by Jeremiah Hackett and Thomas Maloney (July 21-24, 2022, St. Bonaventure, NY). Cfp deadline is October 4, 2021. Details here.

There’s a webinar series running this summer on the history and theology of encounters between Catholic and Muslims. It’s sponsored by the Lumen Christi Institute and the American Cusanus Society. Details here.

The 43rd Cologne Mediaevistentagung (Sept. 5-9, 2022) has extended its Cfp deadline until August 31, 2021. The topic, a rather timely one for our field, is “Consensus.”

Katja Kraus’s research group at the Max Planck Institute is advertising a position for a scholar of the premodern science of soul and body, with expertise in Syriac, Persian, or Hebrew. The application deadline is August 31, 2021. Details here.

The Institute for Research in the Humanities (Wisconsin-Madison) is again advertising the Solmsen Fellowship, a year-long fellow which “sponsors scholars working in the humanities on European history, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, art and culture in the classical, medieval, and/or early modern periods before 1700.” Applications due October 28, 2021.

Congratulations to Tobias Hoffmann, who has been named Professor of Medieval Philosophy at Sorbonne Universit√©. (That’s the position at Paris IV that has been vacant since Pasquale Porro returned to Italy several years ago.)