The Medieval Survey Class pt. II: Textbooks

An obvious question about running a medieval survey class is whether or not to use a textbook. Of the 29 syllabi that we received, a bit more than half used some sort of published collection of readings. (I suspect the percentage would be higher if I could obtain a random collection of medieval syllabi from across all universities. Since here I’m talking mostly to experts in the field, it seems to me likely that my sample includes more folk with the expertise and enthusiasm to assemble their own set of readings.)

So what are people using? Here are the numbers:

  • Philosophy in the Middle Ages: The Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Traditions (3rd ed.) (Hyman, Walsh, and Williams): 10
  • Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary (Klima et al.): 3
  • Five Texts on the Mediaeval Problem of Universals (Spade):
  • Classical Arabic Philosophy (McGinnis and Reisman): 1
  • Basic Issues in Medieval Philosophy (2nd ed.) (Bosley and Tweedale): 1
  • Readings in Medieval Philosophy (Schoedinger): 1
  • The Longman Standard History of Medieval Philosophy (Kolak and Thomson): 1
  • Medieval Philosophy: An Introduction (Maurer): 1

(I should, at this point, thank Mark Boespflug for compiling these numbers. Mark is, in case you were wondering, writing a beautiful dissertation here in Boulder on the history of doxastic voluntarism.)

Obviously, the venerable Hyman and Walsh volume, from Hackett, has a dominant market share. That might be surprising if you’re thinking of the first or second edition, which always struck me as a rather dense and difficult set of texts. But if you look at the 3rd edition, you’ll find that Thomas Williams has done an amazing job of improving on the volume, adding material (often newly translated) that is both accessible and important. Williams is building, moreover, on the very solid foundation of non-Latin material that was the most striking feature of the original Hyman and Walsh volume. Twenty-five years ago, that heavy non-Latin influence struck me as idiosyncratic and mostly unhelpful. But I think it’s pretty obvious today that they were simply ahead of their time. (More on that theme in a later post.)

The only other general anthology to attract significant marketshare is the 2007 Blackwell volume edited by Gyula Klima, Fritz Allhoff, and Anand Jayprakash Vaidya. Again it’s not hard to see why this is a reasonable choice, if you look at the table of contents. As you would expect given the editors, this is a thoughtful attempt to pull together a wide range of important and accessible material. The most striking difference from the Hackett volume is that Islamic material has only a token presence here, and Jewish material no presence at all. Both the Blackwell and the Hackett volume, I might add, are priced very reasonably at around $50 in paperback.

Skipping over the two specialized anthologies on the list, we come to three less popular textbooks. Neither Kolak nor Thomson is an expert in the field, and their choice of readings is fairly amateurish. But when it comes to both the Bosley-Tweedale (Broadview) and the Schoedinger (OUP) volumes, the situation is quite different. These are both extremely erudite and creative collections of material, compiled by scholars with serious knowledge of the field. (I am sorry to see that Prof. Schoedinger has died in the 22 years since that volume was published.) If neither volume has managed to gain much traction in the field, this is perhaps because they are more admirable from a scholarly point of view than from a pedagogical point of view. So, for instance, though we may applaud Schoedinger’s inclusion of William of Sherwood in his anthology, how many of us would actually teach that material? And I cannot believe that anyone can successfully lead a group of undergraduates through the unrelentingly difficult readings on distinctions and universals that lie at the heart of the Bosley-Tweedale volume.

Returning to the theme of my previous post, it is not at all easy to come up with an anthology of medieval readings. (In contrast, an anthology in ancient or early modern is the easiest thing in the world.) It is not clear what topics deserve pride of place, and it is hard to find a path through this material that is genuinely accessible to students.

That brings me, finally, to the last item on the list, Maurer’s Introduction to medieval philosophy, first published back in 1962. This is of course not an anthology but a single-author narrative of the period. I mention it, though, because it is striking how few such attempts at synthesis there are, especially in recent years. John Marenbon attempted this, in two Routledge volumes, back in the 1980s, and a couple of years ago tried again in a “Very Short Introduction” for OUP. Anthony Kenny’s New History of Western Philosophy, also with OUP, contains an entire volume on the medieval period. Joseph Koterski has published an impressive Introduction to Medieval Philosophy (Blackwell). No doubt there are other things I don’t know or am not thinking of. But I think it’s safe to say there are far fewer attempts at this sort of thing than there are edited, multi-author anthologies/guides/companions to the field. Perhaps most of us don’t feel as if we can produce a coherent narrative.

Next time, detailed data on which texts we are actually assigning to our students.

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2017 Books

Here’s my annual list of books in medieval philosophy from the previous year, in completely random order except that the list begins with a few 2016 books that didn’t make last year’s list. The usual apologies for books that got overlooked, coupled with the usual invitation to let me know about new books or ones that I missed. Special thanks to Martin Eyestone here at CU Boulder for a lot of help with this. Help also came from the latest of Thérèse-Anne Druart’s fabulous bibliographical guides to Islamic material.

 

Frank Griffel (ed)., Islam and Rationality: The Impact of al-Ghazâlî. Papers Collected on His 900th Anniversary, vol. 2 (Brill, 2016)

Gregory Moule, Corporate Jurisdiction, Academic Heresy, and Fraternal Correction at the University of Paris, 1200-1400 (Brill, 2016).

Michael Engel, Elijah Del Medigo and Paduan Aristotelianism: Investigating the Human Intellect (Bloomsbury, 2016)

Bernhard Blankenhorn, The Mystery of Union with God: Dionysian Mysticism in Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas (Catholic University of America, 2016)

Camilla Adang, Hassan Ansari, Maribel Fierro & Sabine Schmidtke (eds.), Accusations of Unbelief in Islam: A Diachronic Perspective on Takfîr (Brill, 2016)

Radulphus Brito, Quaestiones super Priora Analytica Aristotelis, ed. Gordon A. Wilson (Leuven, 2016)

Randall B. Smith, Reading the Sermons of Thomas Aquinas: A Beginner’s Guide (Emmaus Academic, 2016)

Parens, Joshua. Leo Strauss and the Recovery of Medieval Political Philosophy (University of Rochester Press, 2016)

Thomas Würtz, Islamische Theologie im 14. Jahrhundert.  Auferstehunglehre, Handlungstheorie und Schöpfungsvorsetllungen im Werk von Sa’ad ad-Din at-Taftazani (De Gruyter, 2016)

Zia Movahed, Reflections on the Logic of Ibn Sînâ and Suhrawardî (Hermes, 2016)

Averroes, Commentum medium super libro Porphyrii. Translatio Wilhelmo de Luna adscripta, ed. Roland Hissette (Averroes Latinus 10) (Peeters, 2016)

Alain Galonnier (ed.), Le De scientiis Alfarabii de Gérard de Crémone.  Contribution aux problèmes de l’acculturation au XIIe siècle (édition et traduction du texte) (Brepols, 2016)

Faith Wallis & Robert Wisnovsky (eds), Medieval Textual Cultures: Agents of Transmission, Translation and Transformation (de Gruyter, 2016)

Mohammad Ali Amir-Moezzi, Maria De Cillis, Daniel De Smet & Orkhan Mir-Kasimov (eds), L’Ésotérisme shi’ite, ses racines et ses prolongements: Shi’i Esotericism: Its Roots and Developments (Brepols, 2016)

 

Christophe Grellard (ed.), Miroir de l’amitié: mélanges offerts à Joël Biard (Vrin)

Henrik Lagerlund and Benjamin Hill (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Sixteenth-Century Philosophy (Routledge)

William Bain (ed.), Medieval Foundations of International Relations (Routledge)

Khaled El-Rouayheb and Sabine Schmidtke (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy (OUP)

Matteo Di Giovanni, Averroè (Carocci editore)

Michael Gorman, Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Hypostatic Union (Cambridge UP)

Anonymous and Peter Abelard, Glossae super Peri hermeneias II: Glossae “Doctrinae sermonum”; De propositionibus modalibus, ed. P. King, K. Jacobi, and C. Strub, Corpus Christianorum Continuatio Mediaevalis 206A (Brepols)

Colleen McCluskey, Thomas Aquinas on Moral Wrongdoing (Cambridge UP)

Claude Panaccio, Mental Language: From Plato to William of Ockham, Engl. transl. by Joshua P. Hochschild and Meredith K. Ziebart, new postscript by the author (Fordham) [original French ed., 1999]

Jean-Baptiste Brenet, Je fantasme. Averroès et l’espace potentiel (Verdier)

Thomas Aquinas, La Royauté, au roi de Chypre, tr. Delphine Carron (Vrin)

John Duns Scotus, Selected Writings on Ethics, translated by Thomas Williams (OUP)

Gyula Klima (ed.), Questions on the Soul by John Buridan and Others: A Companion to John Buridan’s Philosophy of Mind (Springer)

Gerald O’Collins, Saint Augustine on the Resurrection of Christ (OUP)

 Bonaventure, On the Eucharist: Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV, dist. 8-13, ed. and tr. Junius Johnson (Peeters)

Josef van Ess, Theology and Society in the Second and Third Centuries of the Hijra: A History of Religious Thought in Early Islam, Vol. I, transl. by John O’Kane; Vol. II, transl. by Gwendolin Goldbloom; Vol. III, transl. by Gwendolin Goldbloom (Brill)

Geoffrey of Aspall, Quaestions on Aristotle’s Physics, ed. Sylvia Donati and Cecilia Trifogli (British Academy/OUP), two parts, 1250pp [Latin with facing English translation]

Robert Grosseteste, On Free Decision, ed. Neil Lewis (British Academy/OUP) [Latin with facing English translation]

Epistles of the Brethren of Purity, On Companionship and Belief: An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of Epistles 43–45, ed. Samer Traboulsi, tr. Toby Mayer and Ian Richard Netton (OUP)

Epistles of the Brethren of Purity, Sciences of the Soul and Intellect, Part III. An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of Epistles 39-41, ed. & transl. by Carmela Baffioni & Ismail K. Poonawala (OUP)

Ramon Llull, Opera Latina XXXVIII, ed. F. Dominguez Reboiras (Brepols) [Corpus Christianorum, cont. med.]

Laurent Cesalli, F. Goubier, and A. de Libera (eds.), Formal Approaches and Natural Language in Medieval Logic (Brepols)

L. Catalani and R. de Filippis (eds.), Anselmo d’Aosta e il pensioro monastico medievale (Brepols)

Dominic Legge, The Trinitarian Christology of St. Thomas Aquinas (OUP)

Amos Bertolacci and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani, La filosofia medieval tra antichità ed età moderna. Saggi in memoria di Francesco Del Punta (SISMEL)

Börje Bydén and Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist (eds.), The Aristotelian Tradition: Aristotle’s Works on Logic and Metaphysics and Their Reception in the Middle Ages (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies)

Charles P. Nemeth, A Comparative Analysis of Cicero and Aquinas: Nature and the Natural Law (Bloomsbury)

W. O. Duba, The Forge of Doctrine. The Academic Year 1330-31 and the Rise of Scotism at the University of Paris (Brepols)

Han Thomas Adriaenssen, Representation and Scepticism from Aquinas to Descartes (Cambridge UP)

Jon Bornholdt, Walter Chatton on Future Contingents: Between Formalism and Ontology (Brill)

J. Budziszewski, Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Virtue Ethics (Cambridge UP)

Justin E.H. Smith (ed.), Embodiment: A History (Oxford Philosophical Concepts) (OUP), including chapters by Sarah Byers, Yoav Meyrav, Rafael Nájera, and Véronique Decaix

Averroes, The decisive treatise : the connection between Islamic religious law and philosophy, edited with an introduction by Massimo Campanini (Gorgias Press)

Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe and María Cerezo (eds.), History of Logic and Semantics: Studies on the Aristotelian and Terminist Traditions (Brill)

Dominic V. Monti and Katherine Wrisley Shelby (eds.), Bonaventure Revisited: Companion to the Breviloquium (Franciscan Institute)

Dov Schwartz, Messianism in Medieval Jewish Thought, translated by Batya Stein (Academic Studies)

Pauline Allen and Bronwen Neil, Oxford Handbook of Maximus the Confessor (OUP)

Antonia Fitzpatrick, Thomas Aquinas on Bodily Identity (OUP)

Rebecca Hernandez, The Legal Thought of Jalal al-Din al-Suyuti: Authority and Legacy (OUP)

John Duns Scotus, Questions sur la métaphysique: Volume 1 (Livres I à III), tr. Olivier Boulnois and Dan Arbib (PUF)

Shams Constantine Inati, The Problem of Evil: Ibn Sina’s Theodicy, 2nd edition (Gorgias Press)

Brian Stock, The Integrated Self: Augustine, The Bible, and Ancient Thought (University of Pennsylvania Press)

Tiziana Suarez-Nani et Agostino Paravicini Bagliani (eds.), Nouvelles perspectives de recherche dans la pensée et la culture médiévale (XIIe-XVIe siècles) (Sismel)

Durand of St. Pourçain, Scriptum super IV Libros Sententiarum, Buch I, dd. 4-17, ed. Massimo Perrone and Fiorella Retucci (Peeters)

Robert Pasnau, After Certainty: A History of Our Epistemic Ideals and Illusions (OUP)

Nicholas Austin, Aquinas on Virtue: A Causal Reading (Georgetown)

Michael G. Sirilla, The Ideal Bishop: Aquinas’s Commentaries on the Pastoral Epistles (Catholic University of America)

Michael J. Dodds, Unlocking Divine Action: Contemporary Science and Thomas Aquinas (Catholic University of America)

Denis Searby (ed.), Never the Twain Shall Meet? Latins and Greeks Learning from Each Other in Byzantium (De Gruyter)

Jenny Pelletier and Magali Roques (eds.), The Language of Thought in Late Medieval Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Claude Panaccio (Springer)

John Duns Scotus, Notabilia super Metaphysicam, ed. Giorgio Pini (Brepols)

John Doody, Kim Paffenroth, and Helene Tallon Russell (eds.), Augustine and Kierkegard (Lexington Books)

Brian Kemple, Ens Primum Cognitum in Thomas Aquinas and the Tradition: The Philosophy of Being as First Known (Brill)

Adrian Sackson, Joseph Ibn Kaspi: Portrait of a Hebrew Philosopher in Medieval Provence (Brill)

Michael F. Cusato, Timothy J. Johnson, and Steven J. McMichael (eds.), Ordo et Sanctitas: The Franciscan Spiritual Journey in Theology and Hagiography: Essays in Honor of J. A. Wayne Hellmann, O.F.M. Conv. (Brill)

Jacob Langeloh, Erzählte Argumente: Exempla und historische Argumentation in politischen Traktaten c. 1265-1325 (Brill)

Stephen M. Metzger, Gerard of Abbeville, Secular Master, on Knowledge, Wisdom and Contemplation, 2 vols. (Brill)

Tobias Davids, Anthropologische Differenz und animalische Konvenienz: Tierphilosophie bei Thomas von Aquin (Brill)

Naama Cohen-Hanegbi, Caring for the Living Soul: Emotions, Medicine and Penance in the Late Medieval Mediterranean (Brill)

José Miguel Puerta Vílchez, Aesthetics in Arabic Thought from pre-Islamic Arabia through al-Andalus, trans. Consuelo López-Morillas (Brill)

J. Hamesse and J. Meirinhos (eds.), Les Auctoritates Aristotelis, leur utilisation et leur influence chez les auteurs médiévaux: État de la question 40 ans après la publication (Brepols)

T. Suarez-Nani, O. Ribordy, and A. Petagine (eds.), Lieu, espace, mouvement: physique, métaphysique et cosmologie (XIIe-XVIe siècles) (Brepols)

Ramon Llull, Llibre del Tàrtar i el Cristià / Liber Tartari et Christiani, ed. J. Batalla Costa, Ó. L. de la Cruz Palma, and F. Rodriguez Bernal, Latin Works of Raimundus Lullus in Catalan 4 (Brepols)

Robert Pasnau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Volume 5 (Oxford UP)

Andrew Hicks, Composing the World: Harmony in the Medieval Platonic Cosmos (Oxford UP)

Tariq Jaffer, Rāzī: Master of Quranic Interpretation and Theological Reasoning (Oxford UP)

Isabella Image, The Human Condition in Hilary of Poitiers: The Will and Original Sin between Origen and Augustine (Oxford UP)

Sarah Stewart-Kroeker, Pilgrimage as Moral and Aesthetic Formation in Augustine’s Thought (Oxford UP)

Leontius of Byzantium, Complete Works, ed. Brian E. Daley (Oxford UP)

Mor Segev, Aristotle on Religion (Cambridge UP)

Manfred Svensson and David VanDrunen (eds.), Aquinas Among the Protestants (Wiley Blackwell)

J. J. MacIntosh, The Arguments of Aquinas: A Philosophical View (Routledge)

Averil Cameron and Niels Gaul (eds.), Dialogues and Debates from Late Antiquity to Late Byzantium (Routledge)

Benjamin W. McCraw and Robert Arp (eds.), Philosophical Approaches to Demonology (Routledge)

Yvonne Friedman (ed.), Religion and Peace: Historical Aspects (Routledge)

Moshe M Pavlov, Abu’l-Barakat al-Baghdadi’s Metaphysical Philosophy: The Kitab al-Mu‘tabar (Routledge)

Fabienne Baghdassarian and Gweltaz Guyomarc’h (eds.), Réceptions de la théologie aristotélicienne: D’Aristote à Michel d’Éphèse (Peeters)

Marc Ozilou, La monadologie bonaventurienne (Peeters)

Christian Brouwer and Odile Gilon (eds.), Liberté au Moyen Âge (Vrin)

Alain de Libera, La volonté et l’action: Cours du Collège de France 2015 (Vrin)

Éric Mangin, La nuit de l’âme: L’intellect et ses actes chez Maître Eckhart (Vrin)

Maître Eckhart, une écriture inachevée, ed. Élisabeth Boncour, Pierre Gire, and Éric Mangin (Éditions Mimésis)

Siger de Brabant, Traité de l’éternité du monde, intro. and ed. Roger Bruyeron, tr. Françoise Coursaget (Hermann)

Thomas d’Aquin, Les substances séparées, tr., intro., and ed. Nicolas Blanc (Les Belles Lettres)

Henri de Gand, Matthieu d’Aquasparta, Richard de Mediavilla, and Pierre de Jean Olivi, Les anges et le lieu, intro. T. Suarez-Nani, tr. and ed. T. Suarez-Nani et al. (Vrin)

Josep E. Rubio, Raymond Lulle le langage et la raison: Une introduction à la genèse de l’Ars (Vrin)

Hervé Pasqua (ed.), Nicolas de Cues (1401-1464): Le tournant anthropologique de la philosophie, Revue Noesis 26-27 (CRHI)

Anonymous, Introductiones Montane Maiores, edition by Egbert P. Bos and Joke Spruyt (Peeters)

Isabelle Moulin (ed.), Participation et vision de Dieu chez Nicolas de Cues (Vrin)

Fabien Revol, Le concept de création continuée dans l’histoire de la pensée occidentale (Vrin)

Claude Lafleur (ed.), Le sujet « archéologique » et boécien: Hommage institutionnel et amical à Alain de Libera (Vrin)

Daniel Bourgeois, Être et signifier: Structure de la sacramentalité comme signification chez saint Augustin et saint Thomas d’Aquin (Vrin)

William O. Duba, Russell L. Friedman, and Chris Schabel (eds.), Studies in Later Medieval Intellectual History in Honor of William J. Courtenay (Peeters)

Hervé Pasqua (ed.), Infini et altérité dans l’oeuvre de Nicolas de Cues (1401-1464) (Peeters)

Avicenna Latinus, Liber primus naturalium: Tractatus tertius: De his quae habent naturalia ex hoc quod habent quantitatem, ed. J. Janssens (Peeters)

Christopher M. Wojtulewicz, Meister Eckhart on the Principle (Peeters)

Sergei Mariev (ed.), Byzantine Perspectives on Neoplatonism (De Gruyter)

Ross Dealy, The Stoic Origins of Erasmus’ Philosophy of Christ (University of Toronto Press)

Denis Walter, Michael Psellos: Christliche Philosophie in Byzanz (De Gruyter)

Augustinus, Contra Academicos, De beata vita, De ordine, ed. Therese Fuhrer and Simone Adam (De Gruyter)

Augustinus, De Musica, ed. Martin Jacobsson (De Gruyter)

Anthony Robert Booth, Analytic Islamic Philosophy (Palgrave Macmillan)

Gideon Manning and Cynthia Klestinec (eds.), Professors, Physicians and Practices in the History of Medicine: Essays in Honor of Nancy Siraisi (Springer)

Jean-Yves Beziau and Gianfranco Basti (eds.), The Square of Opposition: A Cornerstone of Thought (Springer)

Andreas Speer, Kindler Kompakt: Philosophie des Mittelalters (Springer)

Miklós Vassányi, Enikő Sepsi, and Anikó Daróczi (eds.), The Immediacy of Mystical Experience in the European Tradition (Springer)

David Carr, James Arthur, and Kristján Kristjánsson (eds.), Varieties of Virtue Ethics (Palgrave Macmillan)[chapters by Haldane and Conrad]

Margaret Cameron, Benjamin Hill, and Robert J. Stainton (eds.), Sourcebook in the History of Philosophy of Language: Primary Source Texts from the Pre-Socratics to Mill (Springer)

Reginald Lynch, The Cleansing of the Heart: The Sacraments as Instrumental Causes in the Thomistic Tradition (Catholic University of America)

Thomas Joseph White, The Incarnate Lord: A Thomistic Study in Christology (Catholic University of America)

Kellie Robertson, Nature Speaks: Medieval Literature and Aristotelian Philosophy (University of Pennsylvania Press)

Odo of Tournai, On Original Sin and A Disputation with the Jew, Leo, Concerning the Advent of Christ, the Son of God: Two Theological Treatises, tr. and ed. Irven M. Resnick (University of Pennsylvania Press)

Albert the Great, On the Body of the Lord, tr. Albert Marie Surmanski (Catholic University of America)

David I. Shyovitz, A Remembrance of His Wonders: Nature and the Supernatural in Medieval Ashkenaz (University of Pennsylvania Press)

Steven A. Long, Roger W. Nutt, and Thomas Joseph White (eds.), Thomism and Predestination: Principles and Disputations (Catholic University of America)

Stéphane Loiseau, De l’écoute à la parole: La lecture biblique dans la doctrine sacrée selon Thomas d’Aquin (Cerf)

Emmanuel Falque, Le livre de l’expérience: D’Anselme de Cantorbéry à Bernard de Clairvaux (Cerf)

Michel Corbin, La contemplation de Dieu: Lecture de Monologion et du Proslogion de saint Anselme du Bec (Cerf)

Epistles of the Brethren of Purity, On Companionship and Belief: An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of Epistles 39–41, ed. and tr. Carmela Baffioni and Ismail K. Poonawala (Oxford University Press)

Mark Henninger, Robert Andrews, and Jennifer Ottman (eds.), Robert Greystones on the Freedom of the Will: Selections from his Commentary on the Sentences (Oxford University Press)

Shira Weiss, Joseph Albo on Free Choice: Exegetical Innovation in Medieval Jewish Philosophy (Oxford University Press)

Boyd Taylor Coolman, Eternally Spiraling into God: Knowledge, Love, and Ecstasy in the Theology of Thomas Gallus (Oxford University Press)

Anthony Kaldellis and Niketas Siniossoglou (eds.), The Cambridge Intellectual History of Byzantium (Cambridge University Press)

Andrew Radde-Gallwitz (ed.), The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings, Volume 1: God (Cambridge University Press)

Yousef Casewit, The Mystics of al-Andalus: Ibn Barrajān and Islamic Thought in the Twelfth Century (Cambridge University Press)

Roshdi Rashed (ed.), Ibn al-Haytham’s Geometrical Methods and the Philosophy of Mathematics, translated from the French by J. V. Field (Routledge)

Kifayat Ullah, Al-Kashshaf: Al-Zamakhshari’s Mu’tazilite Exegesis of the Qur’an (De Gruyter)

Marko J. Fuchs, Gerechtigkeit als allgemeine Tugend: Die Rezeption der aristotelischen Gerechtigkeitstheorie im Mittelalter und das Problem des ethischen Universalismus (De Gruyter)

Ilia Galán Díez, The Birth of Thought in the Spanish Language: 14th century Hebrew-Spanish Philosophy (Springer)

Mary Beth Ingham, Understanding John Duns Scotus: ‘Of Realty the Rarest-veined Unraveller’ (Franciscan Institute)

Luis Cortest, Philo’s Heirs: Moses Maimonides and Thomas Aquinas (Academic Studies)

Edward Engelmann, Nature and the Artificial: Aristotelian Reflections on the Operative Imperative (Lexington)

Rose Mary Hayden Lemmons, Ultimate Normative Foundations: The Case for Aquinas’s Personalist Natural Law (Lexington)

Peter Adamson and Peter E. Pormann (eds.), Philosophy and Medicine in the Formative Period of Islam (Warburg Institute)

Robert Andrews and Olle Ferm (eds), Swedish Students at the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford in the Middle Ages (Sällskapet Runica et Mediævalia)

John Wyclif, De scientia Dei, edited by Luigi Campi (OUP/British Academy)

Robert Glenn Davis. The Weight of Love: Affect, Ecstasy, and Union in the Theology of Bonaventure (Fordham)

Alexander Fidora & Nicola Polloni (eds.), Appropriation, Interpretation and Criticism: Philosophical and Theological Exchanges between the Arabic, Hebrew and Latin Intellectual Traditions (FIDEM)

Joseph E. Lowry & Shawkat M. Toorawa (eds.), Arabic Humanities, Islamic Thought. Essays in Honor of Everett K. Rowson (Brill)

Andrés Martínez Lorca. La filosofía en Al Ándalus, 2nd ed (Almuzara)

Farid Jabre, Essais et articles (L’Harmattan)

Saiyad Nizamuddin Ahmad & Sajjad H. Rizvi (eds.), Philosophy and the Intellectual Life in Shî’ah Islam (Shi’ah Institute)

Ulrich Rudolph, Rotraud Hansberger, and Peter Adamson (eds.), English translation by Rotraud Hansberger, Philosophy in the Islamic World: Volume 1: 8th-10th Centuries (Brill) [a translation with bibliographical updates of Philosophie in der islamischen Welt 1: 8.-10. Jahrhundert (Schwabe, 2012)].

Georgio Rahal & Heinz-Otto Luthe (eds.), Promisa nec aspera curans. Mélanges offerts à Marie-Thérèse Urvoy (Les Presses Universitaires, Institut Catholique de Toulouse)

Jules Janssens, An Annotated Bibliography on Ibn Sînâ. Second Supplement (1995-2009) (ACMRS)

Roshdi Rashed (ed.), Lexique historique de la langue scientifique arabe (Olms)

Abû Nasr al-Fârâbî, Las filosofías de Platón y Aristóteles with an Appendix Sumario de las Leyes de Platón. Prólogo y Tratado primero, translation by Rafael Ramón Guerrero (Ápeiron)

Alexander Orwin, Redefining the Muslim Community: Ethnicity, Religion, and Politics in the Thought of Alfarabi (University of Pennsylvania Press)

Mahdî Yazdî Hâ’irî, Universal Science: An Introduction to Islamic Metaphysics, transl. by John Cooper, ed. and intro. by Saiyad Nizamuddin Ahmad (Brill)

Eva-Maria Lika, Proofs of Prophecy and Refutation of the Isma’iliyya. The Kitab ithbat nubuwwat al-nabi by the Zaydi al-Mu’ayyad bi-llah al-Haruni (De Gruyter)

State of the Art: Rega Wood

Here’s another of my occasional series of guest posts from prominent folk in the field, describing what they’ve been up to of late. This post is from Rega Wood (Indiana University):

I’m currently in the final stages of editing Richard Rufus’ Sententia cum quaestiones in libros de anima Aristotelis, which will be about 650 pages in length. I say “I” despite the fact that my name appears second in the list of editors (Ottman, Wood, Lewis, & Martin), because mine is the last job, preparing camera-ready copy. Jennifer Ottman’s name appears first because she is responsible for most of the apparatus of notes which provides a wealth of information about the philosophers whose commentaries show an awareness of Rufus. Her work allows our edition to introduce not only Rufus but the early Latin commentary tradition on De anima. My name comes second because I’m also responsible for most of the 200-page introduction.

Neil Lewis’ philosophical astuteness and constant attention to argumentative structure as well his great knowledge of Rufus’ hero, Robert Grosseteste, make an enormous contribution.  The brilliant Christopher J. Martin not only reads over and comments on the whole work and offers great insight into Rufus’ text of Aristotle, but also provides me with the LaTeX tools I use in typesetting.  Finally the comments of Olga Weijers, Alan Code, and his student Santiago Melo Arias also improve the edition, especially when we grapple with problem passages.  We’ve also had help from Dorothea Frede, Michael Smith, and Max Etchemendy, whose remarkable recreation of Rufus’ outline of the work can be viewed online.

The introduction has five sections. I begin by introducing some of the exciting topics Richard Rufus discusses.  In the second section I establish the genre of the commentary, its date, and its influence (the last with lots of help from Jennifer).  Not surprisingly, the third section establishing the authenticity of the work is the longest.  Next, I provide an account of Rufus’ views on sensation with particular attention to his understanding of ‘spirituality’.  The introduction closes with a statement of the editorial method we follow.

A summary of the fourth section of the introduction will appear as an article entitled, “Spirituality and Perception in Medieval Aristotelian Natural Philosophy.”  Yes, I know the title is too long. But nonetheless, it will appear in good company in a volume edited by Elena Baltuta: Theories of Sense-Perception in the 13th and 14th Centuries.

Other contributors to the volume are Dominik Perler, Juhana Toivanen, Filipe Silva, Paolo Rubini, Daniel de Haan, Andrew LaZella, Lukas Licka, Andre Martin, Martin Klein, and Mattia Mantovani. Their papers cover not only Rufus, but also Thomas Aquinas, Peter Olivi, Duns Scotus, the Perspectivists, Robert Kilwardby, John Buridan and Jean of Jandun; its “themes range from the singularity of perception to accidental perception, immateriality and spirituality in perception and causation.”

Supposing I ever finish numbering variants that extend to more than one line and sundry other such exciting chores, I will make a push this summer to finish Richard Rufus of Cornwall: Metaphysics, Epistemology, & Natural Philosophy. I’ve long had drafts of the first two parts on his life, works, and manuscripts. I also have drafted the sections of part three on metaphysics, epistemology, and natural philosophy. But I’ve only just begun the sections on logic and theology, where I will lean heavily on Rufus’ development of the formal distinction.  Work on the book is my excuse for not giving a mini-seminar on medieval philosophy at Stanford this year, which I usually manage with help from Peter King.  Last summer Peter and I managed not only to introduce Ockham and his razor but also to check out jazz hot spots in San Francisco.

Of course, even skipping out on my Stanford gig, I probably won’t finish the book this summer. And whatever happens I will have to revise the whole thing.  So lots of work to do, but next year I will have some help from graduate students at Indiana University enrolled in “Richard Rufus and the Scholastic Tradition.” Last time I did this, the students had to agree that after reading Duns Scotus, Rufus looks like a model of clarity and simplicity.

Alas, quite often the Rufus book has had to take a back seat to my duties as Rufus’ general editor. And this year we were fortunate enough to receive another three-year NEH grant for this purpose, owing in part to Rufus’ program officer, Ann Meyer. With a little help from Lydia, Ann answers all my questions about budget and bureaucracy. The 2017-2020 grant will fund work on publishing the edition of Rufus’ 1000-page metaphysics commentary, Scriptum in Metaphysicam Aristotelis. Fortunately, since this work’s authenticity isn’t controversial, it won’t need such a long introduction. At the same time we will begin establishing the text of his Oxford theology lectures.  Medievalists interested in Richard Rufus are always welcome to request PDFs of our preliminary and provisional editions.

The Richard Rufus Project (RRP) website hosts the project’s critical editions of the works of Richard Rufus of Cornwall.  Though we are still hard at work on the project, much is already available either on our website or in print via the British Academy’s Auctores Britannici Medii Aevi series directed by John Marenbon. Our website hosts our edition of Rufus’ Memoriale in Metaphysicam Aristotelis as well as the Redactio brevior of the De anima commentary and much of the Scriptum in Metaph, mostly the Redactio brevior but also a snipet from the Redactio longior.

The site also provides aids such as a search engine of the editions on the site, a bibliography of primary and secondary sources, a biography of Rufus, translations of selected works, and a list of the known manuscripts that contain Rufus’ works, along with the works’ incipits. RRP’s site also provides an overview of the process of creating a critical edition, including brief biographies of the editors.

Another highly useful resource is the list of works that RRP cites in its editions. For those works which previously existed only in manuscript form RRP provides transcriptions. Found there are complete transcriptions of Adam Buckfield’s influential De anima commentary and a transcription of Roger Bacon’s unedited, but almost certainly authentic commentary on Aristotle’s De generatione et corruptione.  Not to be forgotten is Robert Andrews’ indispensable compilation of sententiae attributed to Boethius, but not actually found in his works, Boethius dicit.

RRP’s outreach project, Bartholomew’s World, is an introduction to the world of scholasticism aimed at students of Latin in 6th through 12th grades. It offers a brief overview of some scholastic authors along with Latin lessons based on their works, divided into three sections – topics in Human Science, Divine Science, and Natural Science. Other useful resources include extensive indices relating to etymology, grammar, paleography, chronology, and medieval imagery.  Neither website would be possible without RRP’s webmaster, Eva St. Clair, for whose good sense, wit, and love of all things medieval I give thanks daily — or at least as often as unintelligible directives from computer authorities on high force me to call on her assistance.

Conferences and More

Here’s the latest news about what’s happening around the medieval community:

  • Twin workshops are being organized in Morocco for March 2018. On March 12-13, there will be a conference on Averroes in Rabat. On March 15-16, the action will move south to Marrakech, for a workshop on “Human Knowing in the Medieval Arabic and Latin Traditions.” Applications are still being accepted; see details here.
  • L’Institut d’Études Médiévales has organized a conference in Paris on the subject “Existe-t-il une mystique médiévale?” (Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2017)
  • St. Andrews is sponsoring a conference on Medieval Logic and Its Contemporary Relevance (April 30-May 2, 2018). CfP deadline February 1.
  • There’s a conference on Anselm at the University of Houston next spring, extending to all aspects of his career (May 4-5, 2018). CfP deadline February 1. [There doesn’t seem to be anything on the web yet, but anyone interested should contact Sally Vaughn.]
  • Speaking of Anselm, the Institute for Saint Anselm Studies (Manchester, NH) is advertising a summer research grant for graduate students and recent PhDs who are interested in spending a week doing research at the Institute. Application deadline February 1, 2018. Details here.
  • The thirteenth annual Marquette Summer Seminar on Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition will run on June 2 5-27, 2018, on the topic “Principles, Cosmology, and First Philosophy in Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition.” Details here.
  • Jonathan Jacobs is directing an NEH Seminar on Will, Commandment, and Human Perfection in Medieval Jewish Philosophy (Colgate University, July 8-Aug. 4, 2018). [If this looks familiar, it’s because he regularly offers this topic as an NEH summer seminar.] Application deadline: March 7.
  • There’s an interesting interview with Calvin Normore at the Medieval Logic and Semantics blog. It’s mainly devoted to the place of logic in philosophy and in the history of philosophy.
  • The 2017 Rising Scholar Award, sponsored by the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, has been awarded to Daniel Shields (Pontifical College Josephinum) for his paper “Everything in Motion is Put in Motion by Another: A Principle in Aquinas’ First Way.”
  • Through the end of February, Quaracchi is holding one of its occasional 50% off sales. That offer covers a whole lot of important Franciscan philosophical texts. You can find the catalog here.

Various Resources (Fall 2017)

Whenever I find something useful on the web, I tend to suppose that I’m the last person in the world (that is, our little world) to know about it. So apologies in advance if you’ve heard about these before.

  • If you’re reading this, then you’re most likely a regular user of the online Corpus Thomisticum. But did you know that if you’re using the full-text feature of the site (e.g., here), you can double-click on any word and it will take you to the Perseus entry for that word, giving you not just a dictionary definition but an exact account of the part of speech etc. of that particular inflection of the word? This makes reading Aquinas in this format a great resource for anyone working to improve their Latin.
  • Playing around with this feature led me to discover a great new(er) resource from the Perseus people: an online Latin/Greek search tool that ranges over various dictionaries. It’s called Logeion. This has a notably elegant and powerful user interface, and is a particularly useful tool for medievalists, because in addition to indexing Lewis and Short, it gives you Du Cange and also the Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources. It’s worth taking a minute to read the About page, which explains some functionality that you would not discover on your own from the austere Start page.
  • There is also – of course! – a corresponding Logeion app for your phone. My quick impression is that it does not do everything the web-based version does, but it’s still pretty cool.
  • And speaking of apps, the Corpus Thomisticum itself now has an app, currently for Android only, that has the functions of the Index Thomisticus. (I have to report, though, that I couldn’t get it to work on my Android tablet.)
  • Finally, the Aquinas Institute continues to release bilingual volumes of Aquinas’s works, and they are starting to enter into territory that goes beyond looking nice on a shelf — they are producing new translations. Here is the announcement of the first volume of their translation of the Sentences commentary (Bk. IV dd. 1-13). Notice that they’ve kindly made it available for free on the web.

Late Spring News

This will probably be my last post until August. First, some information about upcoming events:

  • The Collège de France is holding a two-day international colloquium, Philosopher au XIIe siècle, at the end of May (Paris, May 29-30, 2017).
  • There’s a conference on Knowledge as Assimilation, ranging over ancient and medieval material, co-sponsored by the Rationality in Perception group in Helsinki and the Representation and Reality group in Gothenberg (Helsinki, June 9-11, 2017).
  • The University of Bonn is holding a conference this summer, on “Time and Modality. Medieval and Contemporary Perspectives” (July 20-22, 2017). Immediately before the conference (July 17-19), they’re running a summer school in conjunction with themes from the conference. The application deadline for the summer school is May 31. Details on the summer school here.
  • The Thomas-Institut has sent out its call for papers for the 2018 Cologne Mediaevistentagung. The topic is The Library: Spaces of Thought and Knowledge Systems. The submission deadline is August 15, 2017. See details here.

Next, some information about people:

  • Nate Bulthius, a recent Cornell PhD, is interviewed at the APA blog, where he discusses in some detail his perspective on studying medieval philosophy.
  • Thomas Ward, currently at Loyola Marymount, is moving to Baylor University, starting this coming fall. With John Haldane already there, as well as Francis Beckwith, and with Tim O’Connor joining the department as well, this makes Baylor quite a prominent option for graduate study in medieval philosophy.

And then some links, both, as it happens, pertaining to Scotus:

  • Tobias Hoffmann’s very useful Scotus bibliography is now available here, where it continues to be updated.
  • Thomas Williams has just come out with an extensive collection of English translations of Scotus’s ethical work (OUP 2017). In addition to the book, there is a website, here. On the website, there are additional translations, links to some of Thomas’s papers, and a remarkable unpublished essay that makes the case for why the Vatican edition of Ordinatio III.26-40 is “so frequently bad that no responsible scholar can rely on it.”

Finally, jobs:

  • There’s a three-year postdoc position at the above-mentioned Helsinki project, Rationality in Perception: Transformations of Mind and Cognition 1250-1550. The application deadline is May 29, 2017. Details here.
  • There’s a two-year postdoc advertised in Munich, connected to the project Natur in politischen Ordnungsentwürfen: Antike, Mittelalter, Neuzeit. Quoting from the ad, “The central concern of the project is the medieval reaction to the ancient idea that God’s rulership to the universe is comparable to that between a political ruler and the state that s/he governs.” The application deadline is June 1, 2017. Details here.

Medieval Books 2016

As in previous years, the order of books is random, except that it begins with 2015 books left off from last year’s list. Also as in previous years, the list is doubtless incomplete (though not as incomplete as it would have been without the help of Martin Eyestone). I’m always glad to know about omissions, which I’ll add to the front of next year’s list.

 

Peter John Olivi, Lectura super Apocalypsim, ed. Warren Lewis (Franciscan Institute, 2015) [Lewis published an English translation with the Franciscan Institute in 2012]

Garrett R. Smith (ed.), Petri Thomae Quaestiones de esse intelligibili, Petri Thomae opera I (Leuven, 2015).

Monica Brînzei (ed.), Nicholas of Dinkelsbühl and the Sentences at Vienna in the Early Fifteenth Century (Brepols, 2015)

Kurt Flasch, Meister Eckhart: Philosopher of Christianity, tr. Anne Schindel and Aaron Vanides (Yale University Press, 2015)

John Pecham, Tractatus de sphaera, edition and translation, with commentary, by Bruce Robert MacLaren and Girard Etzkorn (Franciscan Institute, 2015)

Alexander Fidora (ed.), Guido Terreni, O. Carm. († 1342): Studies and Texts (Brepols, 2015)

Frans Van Liere and Franklin T. Harkins (eds.), Interpretation of Scripture: Practice. A Selection of Works of Hugh, Andrew, Richard, and Leonius of St Victor, and of Robert of Melun, Peter Comestor and Maurice of Sully (Brepols, 2015)

Peter Abelard, Historia calamitatum, ed. A. Andrée (Brepols, 2015)

Ramon Llull, Opera Latina XXXVI, ed. P. M. Beattie, and O. L. de la Cruz Palma (Brepols, 2015) [Corpus Christianorum, cont. med.]

J. Higuera Rubio (ed.), Knowledge, Contemplation and Lullism (Brepols, 2015)

O. Weijers, A Scholar’s Paradise: Teaching and Debating in Medieval Paris (Brepols, 2015)

P. Roszak and J. Vijgen (eds.), Reading Sacred Scripture with Thomas Aquinas: Hermeneutical Tools, Theological Questions and New Perspectives (Brepols, 2015)

L. Lanza, Ei autem qui de politia considerat… Aristotele nel pensiero politico medievale (Brepols, 2015)

Robert Grosseteste, Versio Caelestis Hierarchiae Pseudo-Dionysii Areopagitae, ed. D. A. Lawell (Brepols, 2015)

Thierry of Chartres, The Comentary on the De arithmetica of Boethius, ed. I. Caiazzo (Brepols, 2015)

M. V. Dougherty (ed.), Aquinas’s Disputed Questions on Evil: A Critical Guide (Cambridge UP)

John Marenbon, Medieval Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (OUP)

Ayman Shihadeh (ed.), Doubts on Avicenna: A Study and Edition of Sharaf al-Dīn al-Masʻūdī’s commentary on the Ishārāt (Brill)

Iohannis Duns Scoti Collationes Oxonienses, ed. Guido Alliney and Marina Fedeli (SISMEL)

Damien Janos (ed.), Ideas in Motion in Baghdad and Beyond: Philosophical and Theological Exchanges between Christians and Muslims in the Third/Ninth and Fourth/Tenth Centuries (Brill)

Alî ibn Muhammad Ibn al-Walîd, Avicenna’s Allegory on the Soul : An Ismaili Interpretation. An Arabic edition and English translation of Alî b. Muhammad b. al-Walîd’s al-Risâla al-mufîda, Arabic ed. by Wilferd Madelung & transl. and intro. by Toby Mayer (I.B. Tauris)

Anthony J. Celano, Aristotle’s ethics and medieval philosophy: moral goodness and practical wisdom (Cambridge UP)

Magali Roques, L’essentialisme de Guillaume d’Ockham (Vrin)

Claudia Di Fonzo, Dante e la tradizione giuridica (Carocci)

Giancarlo Garfagnini and Anna Rodolfi (eds.), «Scientia humana» e «scientia divina». Conoscenza del mondo e conoscenza di Dio (ETS)

Anna Rodolfi, “Cognitio obumbrata”. Lo statuto epistemologico della profezia nel secolo XIII (SISMEL-Edizioni del Galluzzo)

Marwan Rashed, L’héritage aristotélicien : textes inédits de l’Antiquité. Nouvelle édition revue et augmentée (Belles lettres)

Ibn Ṭumlūs, Kitāb fī Mantiq (Treatise on Logic), Kitāb al-Ǧadal (Book of Dialectic), & Kitāb al-Amkina al-Muġallia (Book of Sophistical Topics), ed. Fouad Ben Ahmed (Difaf Publishing) [in Arabic, with English introduction]

John Sellars (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Routledge) [incl. medieval chapters by Sarah Byers, Matthew Walz, and Kevin Guilfoy]

Robert Arp (ed.), Revisiting Aquinas’ Proofs for the Existence of God (Brill)

Wilferd Madelung and Sabine Schmidtke (eds.), Al-āḥib Ibn ʿAbbād Promoter of Rational Theology: Two Muʿtazilī kalām texts from the Cairo Geniza (Brill)

al-ʿAllāmah al-Ḥillī, Foundations of Jurisprudence – An Introduction to Imāmī Shīʿī Legal Theory, translated and edited by Sayyid Amjad H. Shah Naqavi (Brill)

Kuni Sakamoto, Julius Caesar Scaliger, Renaissance Reformer of Aristotelianism: A Study of Exotericae Exercitationes (Brill)

Giacomo Zabarella, De rebus naturalibus, ed. José Manuel García Valverde (Brill), 2 vols. [edition of the Latin text]

Christian Rode (ed.), A Companion to Responses to Ockham (Brill)

R. J. Matava, Divine Causality and Human Free Choice: Domingo Báñez, Physical Premotion and the Controversy de Auxiliis Revisited (Brill)

Isabelle Moulin (ed.), Philosophie et théologie chez Jean Scot Érigène (Vrin)

Gianluca Briguglia, Le pouvoir mis à la question : Théologiens et théorie politique à l’époque du conflit entre Boniface VIII et Philippe le Bel (Belles lettres)

Philip McCosker and Denys Turner (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Summa Theologiae (Cambridge UP).

Pasquale Porro, Thomas Aquinas: A Historical and Philosophical Profile, tr. Joseph Trabbic and Roger Nutt (Catholic University of America Press). [from the Italian: Carocci, 2012]

Dawud al-Muqammas, Twenty Chapters (Provo, Utah, forthcoming in 2016).

John Buridan, Les petites sommes de logique, tr. Benoît Patar (Presses Philosophiques)

Blake D. Dutton, Augustine and Academic Skepticism: A Philosophical Study (Cornell).

Bonaventure, Commentary on the Sentences: Sacraments, tr. J.A. Wayne Hellmann, Timothy LeCroy, and Luke Davis Townsend (Franciscan Institute) [= Bk. IV, in English]

John Duns Scotus, The Report of the Paris Lecture: Reportatio IV-A, Volume 1, Parts 1 and 2, edited and translated by Oleg Bychkov and R. Trent Pomplun (Franciscan Institute)

Daria Spezzano, The Glory of God’s Grace: Deification According to St. Thomas Aquinas (Sapientia)

Christopher Shields and Robert Pasnau, The Philosophy of Aquinas, 2nd ed. (OUP) [1st ed . Westview, 2003]

Master Richard Sophista, Abstractiones, ed. Sten Ebbesen, Mary Sirridge, and Jennifer Ashworth (OUP)

Richard Schenk OP, Soundings in the History of a Hope: New Studies on Thomas Aquinas (Sapientia)

Brian Davies, Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Contra Gentiles: A Guide and Commentary (OUP)

Gerhard Krieger, Die “Metaphysik” des Aristoteles im Mittelalter: Rezeption und Transformation (De Gruyter)

Jamal Rachak, Ibn Bâjja (Avempace). Philosophe de Saragosse et Fès (533-1139). Biobibliographie

Anthony J. Lisska, Aquinas’s Theory of Perception: An Analytic Reconstruction (OUP)

Robert Pasnau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy, vol. 4 (OUP)

Amos Bertolacci and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani (eds.), La Filosofia Medievale tra Antichità ed Età Moderna. Saggi in memoria di Francesco Del Punta (1941-2013) (SISMEL)

Thomas Petri, O.P. Aquinas and the Theology of the Body: The Thomistic Foundations of John Paul II’s Anthropology (CUA Press).

Thomas Würtz. Islamische Theologie im 14. Jahrhundert (de Gruyter)

Olga Anna Duhl and Jean-Marie Fritz (eds.), Les cinq sens entre Moyen Age et Renaissance : enjeux épistémologiques et esthétiques (Dijon)

Peter Adamson, Philosophy in the Islamic World: A History of Philosophy without Any Gaps, Volume 3 (OUP)

Anna Marmodoro and David Yates (eds.), The Metaphysics of Relations, Oxford University Press [medieval papers by Brower and Penner]

Sigrid Müller, Theologie und Philosophie im Spätmittelalter (Aschendorff)

Wolfgang Buchüller, Isaak von Etoile: monastische Theologie im Dialog mit dem Neo-Platonismus des 12. Jahrhunderts (Aschendorff)

Davide Monaco, Nicholas of Cusa: Trinity, Freedom and Dialogue (Aschendorff)

Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Book of Job, tr. Brian Thomas Becket Mullady (Aquinas Institute) [English-Latin edition]

Thomas Aquinas, Questions on Love and Charity: Summa theologiae, secunda secundae, Questions 23-46, translated by Robert Miner, with essays by Jeffrey A. Bernstein, Dominic Doyle, Mark D. Jordan, Robert Miner, and Sheryl Overmyer (Yale)

Riccardo Saccenti, Debating Medieval Natural Law: A Survey (Notre Dame)

K. Jacobi and P. King (eds.), Abaelardiana: Glossae super Peri Hermeneias II (Brepols) [Corpus Christianorum, cont. med.]

G. Mongeau, Embracing Wisdom: The Summa theologiae as Spiritual Pedagogy (Brepols)

S. R. Kramer, Sin, Interiority, and Selfhood in the Twelfth-Century West (Brepols)

D. Calma (ed.), Neoplatonism in the Middle Ages: New Commentaries on the ‘Liber de Causis’ and ‘Elementatio Theologica, 2 vols. (Brepols)

Carsten Selch Jensen and Christian Gottlieb (eds.), Teologien i Historien – Historien i Teologien: Festskrift til Professor Lauge O. Nielsen (Eksistensen)

Bernardo C. Bazán, La noétique de Siger de Brabant (Vrin)

Thomas Aquinas, Le Maître, Questions disputées sur la vérité, Question XI, tr. Bernadette Jollès (Vrin) [with Latin]

Thomas Aquinas, L’âme et le corps, tr. Jean-Baptiste Brenet (Vrin) [ST 1a 76-76, with Latin]

Barbara H. Rosenwein, Generations of Feeling: A History of Emotions, 600-1700 (Cambridge UP)

Peter of John Olivi, A Treatise on Contracts, ed. Sylvain Piron, tr. Ryan Thornton and Michael Cusato (Franciscan Institute)

Gregory Reichberg, Thomas Aquinas on War and Peace (Cambridge UP)

Charles F. Briggs and Peter S. Eardley (eds.), A Companion to Giles of Rome (Brill)

Thomas Aquinas, The Treatise on Happiness, The Treatise on Human Acts: Summa Theologiae I-II 1-21, tr. Thomas Williams, commentary by Christina Van Dyke and Thomas Williams (Hackett)

John Buridan, Quaestiones super octo libros Physicorum Aristotelis: Libri III-IV, ed. Michiel Streijger and Paul Bakker (Brill)

Catarina Dutilh Novaes and Stephen Read, The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Logic (Cambridge UP)

Nicholas of Lyra, Literal Commentary on Galatians, ed. and tr. Edward Naumann (Medieval Institute)

Mark D. Jordan, Teaching Bodies: Moral Formation in the Summa of Thomas Aquinas (Fordham)

Jean Porter, Justice as a Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective (Eerdmans)

Lawrin Armstrong, The Idea of a Moral Economy: Gerard of Siena on Usury, Restitution, and Prescription (University of Toronto Press) [editition and translation of 3 texts]

Hunayn ibn Ishâq on His Galen Translations, ed. and tr. John Lamoreaux, with appendix by Grigory Kessel (Brigham Young University Press)

John Slotemaker and Jeffrey Witt, Robert Holcot (OUP)

Robert Andrews. Bero Magni de Ludosia, Questions on the Soul: A Medieval Swedish Philosopher on Life (Runica et Mediaevalia [Stockholm])

Saeed Zarrabi-Zadeh, Practical mysticism in Islam and Christianity : a comparative study of Jalal al-Din Rumi and Meister Eckhart (Routledge)

Rotraud Hansberger (trans.), Philosophy in the Islamic World, Volume 1: 8th–10th Centuries, ed. Ulrich Rudolph, Rotraud Hansberger, and Peter Adamson (Brill). [English translation of Philosophie in der Islamischen Welt Band I: 8.–10. Jahrhundert (Schwabe, 2012)]

Gert Melville and Martial Staub (eds.), Brill’s Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages, 2 vols. (Brill) [English translation of Enzyklopädie des Mittelalters, 2nd ed. (Primus, 2013)]

Monika Michałowska, Richard Kilvington’s Quaestiones super libros Ethicorum: A Critical Edition with an Introduction (Brill)

Paul W. Knoll, “A Pearl of Powerful Learning”: The University of Cracow in the Fifteenth Century (Brill)

Franklin T. Harkins and Aaron Canty (eds.), A Companion to Job in the Middle Ages (Brill)

John P. Bequette (ed.), A Companion to Medieval Christian Humanism: Essays on Principal Thinkers (Brill)

Kirstin Bunge et al. (eds.), The Concept of Law (lex) in the Moral and Political Thought of the ‘School of Salamanca’ (Brill)

Giosuè Ghisalberti, Augustine’s Passions: His Transformation from a Roman Citizen to a Catholic Bishop, 354–401 (Marquette UP)

Emanuela Prinzivalli, Françoise Vinel, and Michele Cutino (eds.), Transmission et réception des Pères grecs dans l’Occident, de l’Antiquité tardive à la Renaissance: Entre philologie, herméneutique et théologie (Actes du colloque international organisé du 26 au 28 novembre 2014 à l’Université de Strasbourg) (Brepols)

Kent Emery, Jr. (ed.), Bulletin de philosophie médiévale 57/2015 (Brepols)

Samuel Presbiter, Collecta ex diuersis auditis in scola magistri Willelmi de Monte (Notes from the School of William de Montibus), ed. Andrew N.J. Dunning (Brepols)

Nicephorus Blemmydes and Iosephus Racendytes, Nicephori Blemmydae De virtute et ascesi necnon Iosephi Racendytae De virtute, ed. E. Gielen (Corpus Christianorum Series Graeca, CCSG 80) (Brepols)

A.-I. Bouton-Touboulic and C. Lévy (eds.), Scepticisme et religion: Constantes et évolutions, de la philosophie hellénistique à la philosophie médiévale (Brepols)

B. Bakhouche (ed.), Science et exégèse: Les interprétations antiques et médiévales du récit biblique de la création des éléments (Genèse 1,1-8) (Brepols)

Augustinus, Sermones de novo testamento (157-183): Sermones in epistolas apostolicas II, ed. S. Boodts (Corpus Christianorum Series Latina, CCSL 41Bb) (Brepols)

Epistles of the Brethren of Purity, Sciences of the Soul and Intellect, Part I: An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of Epistles 32–36, ed. and trans. Paul E. Walker, David Simonowitz, Ismail K., and Godefroid de Callatay (OUP)

Robert Kilwardby, Notule libri Priorum, ed. and trans. Paul Thom and John Scott, Auctores Britannici Medii Aevi 23 and 24, 2 vols. (OUP)

William E. Mann, God, Belief, and Perplexity (OUP)

John Duns Scotus, On Being and Cognition: Ordinatio 1.3, ed. and trans. John van den Bercken (Fordham UP)

Colleen McCluskey, Thomas Aquinas on Moral Wrongdoing (Cambridge UP)

John M. Rist, Augustine Deformed: Love, Sin and Freedom in the Western Moral Tradition (Cambridge UP)

Timothy Samuel Shah and Allen D. Hertzke (eds.), Christianity and Freedom: Volume 1: Historical Perspectives (Cambridge UP)

Catherine Conybeare, The Routledge Guidebook to Augustine’s Confessions (Routledge)

Moshe M. Pavlov, Abū’l-Barakāt al-Baghdādī’s Scientific Philosophy (Routledge)

Kathleen Gibbons, The Moral Psychology of Clement of Alexandria (Routledge)

Jennifer Constantine Jackson, Conversation, Friendship and Transformation: Contemporary and Medieval Voices in a Theology of Discourse (Routledge)

Cristiano Casalini, Aristotle in Coimbra: The Cursus Conimbricensis and the Education at the College of Arts (Routledge)

Mark Edwards and Elena Ene D-Vasilescu (eds.), Visions of God and Ideas on Deification in Patristic Thought (Routledge)

Keagan Brewer, Wonder and Skepticism in the Middle Ages (Routledge)

Caner K. Dagli, Ibn al-‘Arabi and Islamic Intellectual Culture: From Mysticism to Philosophy (Routledge)

Georges Vajda, Pensées médiévales en hébreu et en arabe Études (1931-1981), ed. Elisa Coda, Études musulmanes XLIX (Vrin)

Michele Trizio, Il neoplatonismo di Eustrazio di Nicea, Biblioteca filosofia di Quaestio (Vrin/Edizioni di Pagina)

Graziella Federici Vescovini, Nicolas de Cues: L’homme, atome spiritual, Bibliothèque des Philosophies (Vrin)

Béatrice Bakhouche and Alain Galonnier (eds.), Lectures médiévales et renaissantes du Timée de Platon, Philosophes médiévaux (Vrin/Peeters)

Catherine König-Pralong, Médiévisme philosophique et raison modern: de Pierre Bayle à Ernest Renan, Conférences Pierre Abélard (Vrin)

L. Muehlethaler, G. Schwarb, and S. Schmidtke (eds.), Theological Rationalism in Medieval Islam: New Sources and Perspectives, Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta 258 (Peeters)

Marko J. Fuchs, Gerechtigkeit als allgemeine Tugend: Die Rezeption der aristotelischen Gerechtigkeitstheorie im Mittelalter und das Problem des ethischen Universalismus, Veröffentlichungen des Grabmann-Institutes zur Erforschung der mittelalterlichen Theologie und Philosophie 61 (De Gruyter)

Manfred Ullmann, Aufsätze zur arabischen Rezeption der griechischen Medizin und Naturwissenschaft, ed. Rüdiger Arnzen, Scientia Graeco-Arabica 15 (De Gruyter)

Günter Frank, Topik als Methode der Dogmatik: Antike – Mittelalter – Frühe Neuzeit, Theologische Bibliothek Töpelmann 179 (De Gruyter)

Andreas Speer and Thomas Jeschke (eds.), Schüler und Meister, Miscellanea Mediaevalia 39 (De Gruyter)

Michal Glowala, Singleness: Self-Individuation and Its Rejection in the Scholastic Debate on Principles of Individuation, Philosophische Analyse 70 (De Gruyter)

Jari Kaukua and Tomas Ekenberg (eds.), Subjectivity and Selfhood in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy (Springer)

Alexander Green, The Virtue Ethics of Levi Gersonides (Springer)

Hassan Tahiri, Mathematics and the Mind: An Introduction into Ibn Sīnā’s Theory of Knowledge (Springer)

Joel Kalvesmaki and Robin Darling Young (eds.), Evagrius and His Legacy (Notre Dame)

Douglas Finn, Life in the Spirit: Trinitarian Grammar and Pneumatic Community in Hegel and Augustine (Notre Dame)

Robert Glenn Davis, The Weight of Love: Affect, Ecstasy, and Union in the Theology of Bonaventure (Fordham UP)

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