Conferences and More

Here’s the latest news about what’s happening around the medieval community:

  • Twin workshops are being organized in Morocco for March 2018. On March 12-13, there will be a conference on Averroes in Rabat. On March 15-16, the action will move south to Marrakech, for a workshop on “Human Knowing in the Medieval Arabic and Latin Traditions.” Applications are still being accepted; see details here.
  • L’Institut d’Études Médiévales has organized a conference in Paris on the subject “Existe-t-il une mystique médiévale?” (Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2017)
  • St. Andrews is sponsoring a conference on Medieval Logic and Its Contemporary Relevance (April 30-May 2, 2018). CfP deadline February 1.
  • There’s a conference on Anselm at the University of Houston next spring, extending to all aspects of his career (May 4-5, 2018). CfP deadline February 1. [There doesn’t seem to be anything on the web yet, but anyone interested should contact Sally Vaughn.]
  • Speaking of Anselm, the Institute for Saint Anselm Studies (Manchester, NH) is advertising a summer research grant for graduate students and recent PhDs who are interested in spending a week doing research at the Institute. Application deadline February 1, 2018. Details here.
  • The thirteenth annual Marquette Summer Seminar on Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition will run on June 2 5-27, 2018, on the topic “Principles, Cosmology, and First Philosophy in Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition.” Details here.
  • Jonathan Jacobs is directing an NEH Seminar on Will, Commandment, and Human Perfection in Medieval Jewish Philosophy (Colgate University, July 8-Aug. 4, 2018). [If this looks familiar, it’s because he regularly offers this topic as an NEH summer seminar.] Application deadline: March 7.
  • There’s an interesting interview with Calvin Normore at the Medieval Logic and Semantics blog. It’s mainly devoted to the place of logic in philosophy and in the history of philosophy.
  • The 2017 Rising Scholar Award, sponsored by the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, has been awarded to Daniel Shields (Pontifical College Josephinum) for his paper “Everything in Motion is Put in Motion by Another: A Principle in Aquinas’ First Way.”
  • Through the end of February, Quaracchi is holding one of its occasional 50% off sales. That offer covers a whole lot of important Franciscan philosophical texts. You can find the catalog here.
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Late Spring News

This will probably be my last post until August. First, some information about upcoming events:

  • The Collège de France is holding a two-day international colloquium, Philosopher au XIIe siècle, at the end of May (Paris, May 29-30, 2017).
  • There’s a conference on Knowledge as Assimilation, ranging over ancient and medieval material, co-sponsored by the Rationality in Perception group in Helsinki and the Representation and Reality group in Gothenberg (Helsinki, June 9-11, 2017).
  • The University of Bonn is holding a conference this summer, on “Time and Modality. Medieval and Contemporary Perspectives” (July 20-22, 2017). Immediately before the conference (July 17-19), they’re running a summer school in conjunction with themes from the conference. The application deadline for the summer school is May 31. Details on the summer school here.
  • The Thomas-Institut has sent out its call for papers for the 2018 Cologne Mediaevistentagung. The topic is The Library: Spaces of Thought and Knowledge Systems. The submission deadline is August 15, 2017. See details here.

Next, some information about people:

  • Nate Bulthius, a recent Cornell PhD, is interviewed at the APA blog, where he discusses in some detail his perspective on studying medieval philosophy.
  • Thomas Ward, currently at Loyola Marymount, is moving to Baylor University, starting this coming fall. With John Haldane already there, as well as Francis Beckwith, and with Tim O’Connor joining the department as well, this makes Baylor quite a prominent option for graduate study in medieval philosophy.

And then some links, both, as it happens, pertaining to Scotus:

  • Tobias Hoffmann’s very useful Scotus bibliography is now available here, where it continues to be updated.
  • Thomas Williams has just come out with an extensive collection of English translations of Scotus’s ethical work (OUP 2017). In addition to the book, there is a website, here. On the website, there are additional translations, links to some of Thomas’s papers, and a remarkable unpublished essay that makes the case for why the Vatican edition of Ordinatio III.26-40 is “so frequently bad that no responsible scholar can rely on it.”

Finally, jobs:

  • There’s a three-year postdoc position at the above-mentioned Helsinki project, Rationality in Perception: Transformations of Mind and Cognition 1250-1550. The application deadline is May 29, 2017. Details here.
  • There’s a two-year postdoc advertised in Munich, connected to the project Natur in politischen Ordnungsentwürfen: Antike, Mittelalter, Neuzeit. Quoting from the ad, “The central concern of the project is the medieval reaction to the ancient idea that God’s rulership to the universe is comparable to that between a political ruler and the state that s/he governs.” The application deadline is June 1, 2017. Details here.

Various Announcements

Here’s what’s coming this summer from projects affiliated with Richard Taylor at Marquette:

And here are a few other things you might like to know about:

Various Spring and Summer Events

Here’s the latest assortment of events in the field:

  • The Lumen Christi Institute is again running a series of seminars for doctoral students, with generous funding and enviable locations. The most relevant one for this blog has the topic: Is God Knowable by Natural Reason? Philosophy, Theology, and Trinitarian Thought in the Middle Ages. It will be held this June in Rome, and is directed by Mark Clark and Tim Noone. I’m sorry to say I waited too long to post this, and the deadline is today. See info here. Maybe if you blame me for your application’s being late, they’ll give you an extension.
  • I’m even tardier to announce a conference at Columbia University on Rethinking Philosophy’s Past, 1300-1800. This happened back on Feb. 17-18.
  • The Princeton-Penn-Columbia Gradute Conference in the History of Philosophy has put out its call for papers. The conference is May 20th in Princeton. Submission deadline is March 25th. Apparently there’s no web page as of yet, but the instructions are as follows:

    Papers should not exceed 4000 words (or 30 minutes presentation time). They should be prepared for blind review and sent as a PDF file to ppc.history.conference@gmail.com. In a separate PDF attachment, please include your name, academic affiliation, email address, telephone number, paper title, and an abstract of no more than 300 words.

  • The SMRP is soliciting submissions for its annual Founders’ Award. The prize goes to the best paper for a junior scholar. Deadline is April 1. See details here.
  • Labex Hastec is sponsoring a one-day conference, Les Lumières de l’Orient médiéval aux racines de la Renaissance européenne (Paris, March 21, 2017).
  • Georgetown University, in collaboration with the Ordered Universe Project, is hosting a conference, Aspectus and Affectus: Robert Grosseteste, Understanding and Feeling (Washington, March 31-April 1, 2017).
  • The University of Toronto is beginning an annual conference on the history of metaphysics. This year’s topic is time (April 29-30, 2017). A few details here.
  • The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Thomism has put out a call for papers for its session at the 2017 meeting of the American Catholic Philosophical Association (Dallas, 16-19 November 2017). Deadline is May 15th.
  • The Cornell Summer Colloquium is back, but not in Ithaca. This year, Scott MacDonald is running the colloquium in Brooklyn (June 7-9, 2017).
  • The Nordic Network for the History of Philosophy is organizing a workshop on Perception, Knowledge, and Assimilation (Helsinki, June 12, 2017). It’s aimed at younger scholars, and has some funding to cover expenses. Application deadline is March 31. Details here. [Please note correct date, changed from my original post.]
  • Finally, the Aquinas Institute is raffling off a complete set of its Opera omnia series. Enter before March 7th, here.

Various End-of-Year News Items

Here are various things that I’ve been meaning to announce. First a prize:

  • The Charles Schmitt Prize is on again, covering intellectual history, 1500 to the present. Doctoral students and new PhDs only. The deadline is December 31. Details here.

Next, some conferences:

Upcoming Conferences etc.

Fall 2016 Conferences

Although it still feels like summer in Boulder (judging strictly by the weather), it is time to bring the blog back to life. First, some conferences not previously announced for this fall:

Also, here are three calls for papers, two from the Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy:

and a third from the Aquinas and ‘the Arabs’ Group, also for Kalamazoo (contact nicholas.oschman@marquette.edu)

(Unfortunately, the deadline for all three of these is today, Sept. 19th, but perhaps you can get a brief extension from the organizers.)