Upcoming Conferences

Here’s what’s come in recently about upcoming conferences in medieval philosophy:

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The Latest Conference News

Here’s the latest news about conferences etc.

News of All Sizes

Here’s the latest collection of news and events that’s come my way:

Post-Docs, Grants, Summer Schools, Etc.

  • I don’t usually post information about medieval jobs that are advertised at philjobs.org, but Jeff Brower asked me to call attention to the very attractive three-year postdoc that Purdue University is advertising, specifically in medieval philosophy! The application deadline is the end of December. Details here.
  • As the Daily Nous reported a few weeks back, a couple of medievalists have recently won grants of around $2M from the European Research Council.
    • Dragos Calma (Cambridge) won for his project: “Neoplatonism and Abrahamic Traditions. A Comparative Analysis of the Middle East, Byzantium and the Latin West (9th-16th Centuries).”
    • Catarina Dutilh Novaes (Groningen) won for her project: “The Social Epistemology of Argumentation.” (This is evidently not an historical project, however.)
  • Enrique Alarcón is directing a conference this spring: “Inteligencia y voluntad en Tomás de Aquino” (April 26-27, 2018, Pamplona).
  • The Maimonides Centre in Hamburg is organizing a summer school for graduate students on “Sceptical Strategies, Methods, and Approaches in the Middle Ages: Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Traditions” (July 29-Aug. 3, 2018, in Hamburg). Details here.
  • The Lumen Christi Institute is organizing a summer seminar for doctoral students on “St. Thomas Aquinas on Free Choice” (June 24-July 4, 2018, Chicago), and a second on “Truth and Authority in Augustine’s City of God” (July 21-28, 2018, Berkeley). Details here.
  • The Benedictine Abbey in Tyniec (near Cracow) is hosting a conference next fall: “Altiora te ne quaesieris (Sir. 3, 22): The medieval pursuit of wisdom” (September 2-7, 2018). Cfp deadline is March 31.
  • A useful Aquinas resource to know about is the Aquinas Institute‘s online version of their bilingual editions. Everything they’ve published is available free here, in an easy-to-use, searchable bilingual format. As of now, that consists in Sent. IV dd. 1-25, ST, In Job, In Matt., In Johan., and all of the Pauline commentaries. For scholars, the Corpus Thomisticum is still clearly much better, but for students this could come to be a very useful resource.

Conferences and More

Here’s the latest news about what’s happening around the medieval community:

  • Twin workshops are being organized in Morocco for March 2018. On March 12-13, there will be a conference on Averroes in Rabat. On March 15-16, the action will move south to Marrakech, for a workshop on “Human Knowing in the Medieval Arabic and Latin Traditions.” Applications are still being accepted; see details here.
  • L’Institut d’Études Médiévales has organized a conference in Paris on the subject “Existe-t-il une mystique médiévale?” (Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2017)
  • St. Andrews is sponsoring a conference on Medieval Logic and Its Contemporary Relevance (April 30-May 2, 2018). CfP deadline February 1.
  • There’s a conference on Anselm at the University of Houston next spring, extending to all aspects of his career (May 4-5, 2018). CfP deadline February 1. [There doesn’t seem to be anything on the web yet, but anyone interested should contact Sally Vaughn.]
  • Speaking of Anselm, the Institute for Saint Anselm Studies (Manchester, NH) is advertising a summer research grant for graduate students and recent PhDs who are interested in spending a week doing research at the Institute. Application deadline February 1, 2018. Details here.
  • The thirteenth annual Marquette Summer Seminar on Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition will run on June 2 5-27, 2018, on the topic “Principles, Cosmology, and First Philosophy in Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition.” Details here.
  • Jonathan Jacobs is directing an NEH Seminar on Will, Commandment, and Human Perfection in Medieval Jewish Philosophy (Colgate University, July 8-Aug. 4, 2018). [If this looks familiar, it’s because he regularly offers this topic as an NEH summer seminar.] Application deadline: March 7.
  • There’s an interesting interview with Calvin Normore at the Medieval Logic and Semantics blog. It’s mainly devoted to the place of logic in philosophy and in the history of philosophy.
  • The 2017 Rising Scholar Award, sponsored by the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, has been awarded to Daniel Shields (Pontifical College Josephinum) for his paper “Everything in Motion is Put in Motion by Another: A Principle in Aquinas’ First Way.”
  • Through the end of February, Quaracchi is holding one of its occasional 50% off sales. That offer covers a whole lot of important Franciscan philosophical texts. You can find the catalog here.

Upcoming Events

There’s a lot to report on events in the field this coming year. Here’s a start:

Late Spring News

This will probably be my last post until August. First, some information about upcoming events:

  • The Collège de France is holding a two-day international colloquium, Philosopher au XIIe siècle, at the end of May (Paris, May 29-30, 2017).
  • There’s a conference on Knowledge as Assimilation, ranging over ancient and medieval material, co-sponsored by the Rationality in Perception group in Helsinki and the Representation and Reality group in Gothenberg (Helsinki, June 9-11, 2017).
  • The University of Bonn is holding a conference this summer, on “Time and Modality. Medieval and Contemporary Perspectives” (July 20-22, 2017). Immediately before the conference (July 17-19), they’re running a summer school in conjunction with themes from the conference. The application deadline for the summer school is May 31. Details on the summer school here.
  • The Thomas-Institut has sent out its call for papers for the 2018 Cologne Mediaevistentagung. The topic is The Library: Spaces of Thought and Knowledge Systems. The submission deadline is August 15, 2017. See details here.

Next, some information about people:

  • Nate Bulthius, a recent Cornell PhD, is interviewed at the APA blog, where he discusses in some detail his perspective on studying medieval philosophy.
  • Thomas Ward, currently at Loyola Marymount, is moving to Baylor University, starting this coming fall. With John Haldane already there, as well as Francis Beckwith, and with Tim O’Connor joining the department as well, this makes Baylor quite a prominent option for graduate study in medieval philosophy.

And then some links, both, as it happens, pertaining to Scotus:

  • Tobias Hoffmann’s very useful Scotus bibliography is now available here, where it continues to be updated.
  • Thomas Williams has just come out with an extensive collection of English translations of Scotus’s ethical work (OUP 2017). In addition to the book, there is a website, here. On the website, there are additional translations, links to some of Thomas’s papers, and a remarkable unpublished essay that makes the case for why the Vatican edition of Ordinatio III.26-40 is “so frequently bad that no responsible scholar can rely on it.”

Finally, jobs:

  • There’s a three-year postdoc position at the above-mentioned Helsinki project, Rationality in Perception: Transformations of Mind and Cognition 1250-1550. The application deadline is May 29, 2017. Details here.
  • There’s a two-year postdoc advertised in Munich, connected to the project Natur in politischen Ordnungsentwürfen: Antike, Mittelalter, Neuzeit. Quoting from the ad, “The central concern of the project is the medieval reaction to the ancient idea that God’s rulership to the universe is comparable to that between a political ruler and the state that s/he governs.” The application deadline is June 1, 2017. Details here.