Various Useful Links

Here are some links to resources on the web that I (re)discovered over the last some months:

  • Sydney Penner’s comprehensive Suárez bibliography, building on the work of Jacob Schmutz.
  • The Post-Reformation Digital Library. This is an amazing source for digital versions of early printed books.
  • The Logic Museum. A repository for all sorts of materials in the history of philosophy. Particularly useful for the many text files of important medieval works that have somehow been created and posted here.
  • Thomistica.org. This is a new site, edited by Timothy Kearns, and dedicated to discussing “problems and questions within Thomism and also between Thomism and the world.” The site is not to be confused with Thomistica.net, which tilts more theological, and tends to focus more on announcing events.
  • Lessici fisosofici. This site has collected digital copies of 21 Latin philosophical lexicons from the fifteenth through the early seventeenth centuries, and it’s thoroughly indexed them with hyperlinks, so that you can very quickly look up whatever word you’re interested in, in multiple dictionaries. Yes, someone really did this.

 

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This entry was posted in Links.

3 comments on “Various Useful Links

  1. Jean-Luc Solère says:

    The PRDL is great, but I would recommend some caution when using it for medieval authors. For instance, the Rationale Divinorum Officiorum is not by Durand of Saint-Pourçain. Better check with tools such as Schönberger’s Repertorium.

  2. Don’t for get to include the work of RAINER SPECHT on SUÀREZ (2 Vols. Meiner Verlag, Hamburg) in your Suárez-Bibliography.

  3. Nathanael Johnston says:

    http://www.lempt.org/Main_Page

    I don’t know if you’re familiar with this site but it is by some of the same folks involved with PRDL.

    “LEMPT is a transcription project of early modern lexica relating to philosophy and theology. The goal of LEMPT is to create a full-text index of early modern lexica in order to facilitate research of concepts ca. 1500-1700.”

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